Why the Bone Broth Frenzy? Plus Bone Broth and Gravy Recipe

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May 25, 2014

I can't believe I'm finally getting around to blogging a bone broth recipe! I have made it for years and years and never took photos but now so many people are jumping on the broth bandwagon (YAY! this makes me very happy!) and so others are asking "What's the go with bone broth?"  or "What's this broth frenzy all about?" and finally, "Alisha, we have searched your site and can't find your broth recipe!" Ooops.

So here it is in it's very simple, but now easily accessible form (ie. not just typed out on my facebook page)

Oh, but before we jump into all things brothy, to answer quickly why broth has a frenzy and indeed deserves a frenzy: People are excited about getting their gut health back! The information out there about our health is overwhelming but if you stick by this simple rule  "happy, healthy gut = happy, healthy you!" you almost can't go wrong ok? Got it? For more information why gut health is the pinnacle of our health please read my gut health series HERE.

One of the blogs in that series talks about the benefits of broth for gut health.  In a nutshell, what we are doing when we are making broth is pulling the bone components, marrow and cartilage, into the liquid. They contain a protein molecule called collagen. Collagen contains two amino acids: proline and glycine. These amino acids work on healing the digestive tract (from mouth to bum!). It's almost like using putty to help fill and repair any holes we may have in this mucosal lining.  So if you have food intolerances, IBS, leaky gut, bowel disease of any sort - you WILL have these holes and that means you have holes in your immune system as well.

So let's get brothy!

beef bones

This is what 2 kg of bones looks like 

 

Firstly, get yourself 2 kg of organic beef bones. If you are lucky enough to buy your organic beef in bulk (I need a big freezer!), save your bones and freeze until you have enough or else do as I do and go to your organic butcher and ask for it! Currently costs me $6.45 to buy 2 kg of organic beef bones. I keep specifying organic because it is quite important. This method of cooking involves pulling everything out of those bones into the water which you will be drinking and eating. Toxins, chemicals, heavy metals and more are found in high and concentrated levels in the animals bones so choosing organic means you will not be ingesting all that!

 

You will need a baking tray, a large pot (6 Litre capacity is ideal), a stove top and an oven.

Ingredients -

2 kg of organic beef bones
3 Litres of filtered water
2 carrots roughly chopped
2 celery stalks with leaves roughly chopped
1 brown onion roughly chopped
2 bay leaves
1 tspn of dried oregano
1 tspn of dried thyme
1/2 bunch of fresh parsley
1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar (very important! this is helping with the breaking down of the cartilage and extracting any meat on the bone)  

bonebroth  

Method Roast your bones in the oven for 45 minutes at 180 degrees (I think roasting first is best for all beef bones especially if any meat is still clinging to the sides)

Once this is done, put the bones in your big pot on the stove top and add all other ingredients, make sure bones are all covered in water.

Bring to the boil and then quickly turn down to simmer, pop on a lid and keep it there for 24-48 hours. Yes! You heard right, this is how long it takes to get the gelatin formed in the water and that is the part we are really going to the trouble to do this for. Less time will still result in a lovely broth to add to stews, soups etc. but we are wanting GUT HEALTH properties yes? So leave it that long. I ALWAYS do for the full 48 hours. Plus it's more exciting to strain and jar it up once you have waited this long 😉

(yes, you can do this in a slow cooker but you will need a very large 6 Litre slow cooker or you can halve the recipe which obviously won't yield as much)

So once the magical hour arrives, strain the all liquid off and pop in jars with a good inch of space at the top so they can be frozen safely.

*I sometimes do a second batch with everything still left in the pot, I add 2 litres of water this time and another 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar and leave it for another 24 hours. It won't be as gelatinous as your first batch but it will still have a lot of goodness 🙂

Store your jars in the freezer for 6-8 months and keep 1-2 jars in the fridge (depending how often you will be using it) which will keep 2-3 weeks.

Once cold, a disc of fat will rise to the top of the jar. This is magic for using as a cooking fat so have a glass container or another jar to keep your little fat 'discs' in once you have finished with your jar of broth. Use it for frying or baking veggies or meat etc.

*keep the fat on top as a temporary second lid in your broth jar if you are not using a whole jar at once. It stores better that way.

  broth jars

broth in freezer with the fat dics formed

 

There is so much you can do with this gut health liquid! Add to all dishes requiring liquid or a stock, add it to your casseroles, your bolognaise, soups, stews. Warm some up on the stove for a mug to sip on and add a pinch of himalayan salt to it for extra flavour. I also use some to make my gravy!

 

Bone Broth Gravy

So we know that packet gravies are icky and they are just starchy and floury and contain additives, anti-caking agents and numbers that we just don't want or need. So from now on you have all the means to make the simplest, tastiest gravy on the block.

So after you have roasted your meat (whatever type!) you remove it from the baking tray and pop it somewhere to rest for a wee while. Pop the baking tray onto a couple of stove top burners on low.

Pour in about 3/4 cup of bone broth into the tray and scrape all the lovely bits off the bottom with a wooden spoon or wooden flat edged scraper thingy. Just mix it all together.

Then add 1 tblspn of arrowroot flour (or thickener of choice) and whisk away until you start seeing it thicken. Keep whisking, you may need to add more of your bone broth depending on how thick you like your gravy.

Add himalayan or sea salt to taste and voila. 5 minutes. So delish!  

gravy  

The very broth passionate Alexx Stuart wrote up an incredible blog to cover many, many broth and stock questions so I will leave that link HERE because it's an excellent resource if diving into all things brothy and stocky.  

 

Yours in Health,

 

Alisha


24 Responses

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

March 22, 2015

Hi Fiona! Absolutely, Chicken broth is so yummy and needs less time – you only need 12-24 hours for chicken and just replace the beef bones with 3-4 organic chicken carcasses (I save them up in the freezer or you can buy them from a good butcher)

Fiona
Fiona

March 24, 2015

Thanks Alisha x

Rachel
Rachel

April 26, 2017

Great recipe Alisha! I personally drink Au Bon Broth as I’m too busy to make my own. So far, their organic broth has been amazing for my body. My skin cleared up and my joint pains have disappeared.

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

October 03, 2014

Hi Georgia, I don’t unfortunately. I do know that a new Butcher has opened in Tingalpa which is probably closest. They are called Andy’s meats and are on belmont Road. They are doing a lot of freerange and grassfed meats so I would get in touch and ask them!

Fiona
Fiona

March 21, 2015

Hi Alisha, great blog. I am looking forward to trying this, and it’s so versatile!
I am learning so much from your blogs – thankyou.
I was wondering if u had a recipe for chicken bone broth – would it also be beneficial like the beef broth? The reason I ask is u suggest using it in place of stock, so my logic suggests a chicken version would be great in place of chicken stock. Or do u think the beef 1 would be a sufficient alternative to chicken stock?

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

September 19, 2014

I would see how you go with using the apple cider vinegar in this recipe Alex as without it, you aren’t going to get the breakdown of the cartilage and bone into the water as much. The vinegar is what extracts the amino acids into your broth so you could definitely try without but it won’t be as gelatinous. Hope that helps :)

Georgia O'Shea
Georgia O'Shea

October 02, 2014

Thanks for reminding me that I need to make more bone broth Alisha. I have only made chicken but I want to make beef. Do you know an organic butcher on the bayside?

Ariel
Ariel

August 13, 2014

I’m wanting to make this as my partner has a cold coming on and I’m trying to steer him off popping antibiotics. I nervous about simmering for 24 hours though. Is that safe? What about the electricity bill?

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

August 13, 2014

Very safe in my house as we have electric stove top. On a low heat shouldn’t do too much to your electricity bill. You can always use a slow cooker if you have one too!

Alex
Alex

September 17, 2014

Loving your blog!! I am in need of some serious gut healing so was recommended trying bone broth (also as a substitute for stock) but am a bit concerned about the apple cider vingar. Amoungst many others I am fructose intolerant so i would just leave out the onion but apples are potent for me. Also, I recently went to a naturopath and had vinegar added to my very long ‘cant eat’ list. Is apple cider vinegar something i should steer clear of, or would it be ok in this?

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

June 05, 2014

You had a lid on? It needs to be covered but yes definitely add water to have everything covered at all times :)

Mel @ The cook's notebook
Mel @ The cook's notebook

June 23, 2014

I’m making bone broth tonight with organic lamb bones – smells amazing. As we have gas bottles for our stove and I don’t want them to run out, I pop it in oven on about 100c overnight.

Belinda jones
Belinda jones

June 05, 2014

Hi there, I love your work. I’m just wondering can you make a stock in a presser cooker and get the same results? Would it need as much time? Thanks

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

June 05, 2014

Definitely and I would cut the cooking time by at least half, even a third!

Hannah
Hannah

June 03, 2014

Hi Alisha, I love bone broth & have it a few times now – only with beef bones. I am going to make a chicken stock from a carcass of a roast chook. Is the process the same? I was thinking I wouldn’t need to roast because it is cooked already – perhaps a shorter simmering time? Thanks, love your work ;)

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

June 04, 2014

Hi Hannah, Yep, definitely no need for roasting the bones first and I usually leave my chicken stock simmering for only 24 hours. You can do longer though! :)

Hannah
Hannah

June 04, 2014

I simmered for a few hours on the stove top & nearly all the liquid disappeared. Is it ok to top up the water & keep on simmering?

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

May 27, 2014

That’s great Fred, your gut will be loving you! Thanks so much for the comment :)

Alexx
Alexx

May 31, 2014

Thanks for sharing my stock nerd posts Alisha. Loving the look of that broth and just want to dive on in! xx

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

May 27, 2014

Hi Lara, Chicken broth is great when simmered for longer. This is a good one to do in a slow cooker as chicken carcasses can be broken up a bit smaller, I have left chicken broths on for 48 hours but it will still be good if left 12-24 hrs. The longer the better! :)

naughtynaturopathmum
naughtynaturopathmum

May 27, 2014

He he Kirri, glad I get you brothy ;) x

Lara Busch
Lara Busch

May 25, 2014

Is there much difference with chicken broth ? as that is what I have been making, but I am a bit apprehensive to simmer for 24 hrs. I got the recipe from Nourishing Traditions bk.

Fred Phillips
Fred Phillips

May 25, 2014

Excellent blog Alisha! I recently jumped on the bone broth bandwagon for my own gut health.

Have an awesome day!
Fred

kirri white
kirri white

May 25, 2014

I’m all brothy now – thanks to you :)

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